Compassion Cultivation Training

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Thursday evenings from 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

9 week course   $324.00
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What is Compassion Cultivation Training?

CCARE LogoCompassion Cultivation Training (CCT) is a nine-week program developed at Stanford University Medical School’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education by a team of researchers, contemplative scholars, and clinical psychologists. The CCT program integrates traditional contemplative practices with contemporary psychology and scientific research on compassion. CCT is designed to develop the qualities of compassion, empathy, and kindness for oneself and for others.

Compassion

Compassion is a process that unfolds in response to suffering. It begins with the recognition of suffering, which then gives rise to thoughts and feelings of empathy and concern. This, in turn, motivates the willingness to take action to relieve that suffering.

Cultivation

Humans have a natural, innate capacity for compassion. However, everyday stress, social pressures and life experiences can make it difficult to fully experience and/or express this capacity. Each of us can choose to nurture and grow the compassionate instinct, like a plant that is carefully cultivated from a small seed. This process requires patience, steady care, attention, proper tools, and a supportive environment.

Training

The process of cultivating compassion involves training our own minds, development of mindful awareness of thoughts, emotions, and physical sensations, developing specific skills in how we relate to others and ourselves, and intentionally choosing compassionate thoughts and actions.

Why?

Cultivating compassion goes beyond feeling more empathy and concern for others. It develops the resiliency and strength to be with suffering, the courage to take compassionate action, and the resilience to prevent empathy fatigue. These qualities support a wide range of goals:  from less personal distress, anxiety or depression; improving personal relationships; and ultimately, making a positive difference in the world through ones’ actions, small and large.

Compassion cultivation can also support one’s own health, happiness, and well-being. Preliminary research suggests that CCT and similar programs can increase self-compassion and self-care, reduce stress, anxiety, and depression, and enhance connection with others.

The senior author of CCT, Thubten Jinpa, describes the program in these words: “What CCT aims to do is to make people become more aware and more connected with their compassionate nature so that their instinctive response to a given situation will come from that compassionate understanding standpoint rather than negative excessive judgment.”

Who

CCT is designed to support anyone who wants to cultivate compassion for themselves and for others. This includes parents, caregivers, educators, healthcare professionals, therapists, executives, public servants, and people in a wide range of professions and life contexts. No previous meditation experience is required.

What to expect

  • A two-hour weekly class that includes discussion, brief review of current relevant scientific research on compassion and empathy, and in-class partner and small-group listening and communication exercises
  • Daily meditation practices to develop kindness, empathy, compassion for others, and self-compassion
  • Real-world “homework” assignments to promote the development of compassionate thoughts and actions
  • An educational experience that will positively change your relations with yourself, with others, and ultimately, our community.

Sign up for the class on our booking tool under “Workshops.”